Jeffrey LewisI'm clean

One picks up a variety of strange souvenirs and ephemera in this business. My end of year dosimetry report from Los Alamos strikes me as one.

We had to wear dosimeters when we went to see the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos last summer.

Comments

  1. Plutonium Page (History)

    Geez, when I first saw your post title on my RSS reader, I thought it said “I’m clear“, as in, Tom Cruise.

    Anyway, I’m glad you’re “clean”, Jeffrey. Always good to know 😉

    I still have my Hanford dosimetry report from 1994. I wasn’t too “clean”.

    Greetings from Albuquerque, by the way. Next time you’re at LANL, shoot me an email and I’ll make the drive.

  2. Jeffrey Lewis (History)

    It’s a deal.

    And you won’t have to drive, since I always add a couple of days with friends in the ABQ.

    In fact, I have an excellent picture with Sandy the Lab, arranged by a friend.

  3. Anon (History)

    It´s the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility; DARHT. (TA-15.)

  4. Lao Tao Ren (History)

    Hmmmm…. I have some doubts about your claims to cleanliness.

    Was that before or after you took a shower (at the labs after you…. went looking for MRU?), or did you join the Baath party?

    Besides, someone swears that they saw you munching on a ham sandwich last month.

    Your readers want verification.

  5. thermopile (History)

    Glad to see LANL is still using millirem, a much more convenient unit of absorbed dose. Has anyone really gotten their arms around sieverts and grays? They’re supposed to be more metric-friendly, but they seem so klunky.

  6. Jeffrey Lewis (History)

    Anon:

    Not sure where the extraneous “s” came from or how I transposed the R & H; I need a copy editor.

  7. Lao Tao Ren (History)

    I need a copy editor too, MRU should have read MUF.

    Let’s write an NSF proposal!

  8. Allen Thomson (History)

    > Has anyone really gotten their arms around sieverts and grays?

    You know, every time I come across them I have to look up the definition. Upon which I say, “Oh, that should be easy to remember!” Then the next time it’s exactly the same thing. Maybe I get sieverts and grays confused with reptilian and gray aliens.

    Let’s just go back to rads.

  9. Carey Sublette (History)

    Glad to see LANL is still using millirem, a much more convenient unit of absorbed dose. Has anyone really gotten their arms around sieverts and grays? They’re supposed to be more metric-friendly, but they seem so klunky.

    It easy! Just use centiSieverts (cSv) and centiGrays (cGy)! A cGy is a rad, and a cSv is a rem (give or take a slight redefinition of a quality factor). Think of them as pseudonyms and pretend nothing has changed. Of course a “millirem” would then be a milli-cSv, not SI-kosher.

Pin It on Pinterest